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Pharmacy Residency Podcast: Residency Interviews and Advice


Jul 13, 2021

Long Commute? Check out these resources. Books are free if you've never been on Audible before, but of course, the podcast and YouTube channel are free:

Memorizing Pharmacology Podcast: https://apple.co/3r579RG

Memorizing Pharmacology Audiobook: https://adbl.co/3kkc3ct

Memorizing Pharmacology Mnemonics Audiobook: https://adbl.co/3r6ZX7A

Pharmacotherapy Audiobook: https://adbl.co/3AXYqVX

Pharmacotherapy Casebook: https://adbl.co/36yfHXT

If you have trouble contact me at tonythepharmacist@gmail.com 

Long Commute? Check out these resources. Books are free if you've never been on Audible before, but of course, the podcast and YouTube channel are free:

Memorizing Pharmacology Podcast: https://apple.co/3r579RG

Memorizing Pharmacology Audiobook: https://adbl.co/3kkc3ct

Memorizing Pharmacology Mnemonics Audiobook: https://adbl.co/3r6ZX7A

Pharmacotherapy Audiobook: https://adbl.co/3AXYqVX

Pharmacotherapy Casebook: https://adbl.co/36yfHXT

If you have trouble contact me at tonythepharmacist@gmail.com 

Welcome to the pharmacy residency podcast. I wanted to talk a little bit about another podcast that I started the Memorizing Pharmacology podcast, as well as four books that can help you through your APPEs, especially if you have one of those long commutes where you kind of just need to absorb that information osmotically is that how it would be a basically making it audio book university? So again, I'm Tony Guerra, a pharmacist, and I wanted to talk a little bit about the pharmacology podcast and then some other books that may or may not be free depending on if you're an Audible member. So, of course the podcast is free. It's the Memorizing Pharmacology podcast. And what I'm focusing on is the drug prefixes and suffixes to kind of increase your inventory of medications. So, if you know the -tidine suffix, which is episode two then, you know, famotidine, nizatidine, cimetidine, and ranitidine which, you know, has been taken off the market.

But again, good to know that it is off the market and what the issues are with that one. But then again, you've also got to kind of differentiate a little bit because famotidine is quite a bit safer than cimetidine now the active ingredient in the new Zantac. Cimetidine has all those CYP interactions. And I talk a little bit about those, or for example, episode five is the -prazole suffix where it can get really confusing because sometimes on note cards you'll see -azole as a suffix. And, you know, from chemistry that -azole is just a functional group. It has nothing to do with that. Prazole is for proton pump inhibitors like Omeprazole and esomeprazole. And then you've got -piprazole, which is an anti-psychotic. So, you've got Abilify and Rexulti, brexpiprazole, and then you've got -conazole, which is fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, which is an antifungal. So, there's some confusion about how to use the suffixes properly, but if you do use them properly, then instead of learning one drug at a time you can learn many, many drugs at a time. So, for the puzzles we're talking about, I think there are six proton pump inhibitors for the conazoles, I think there's at least five azole antifungals that are really in use. And then the H-2 blockers, there's three that are in use. And so, by learning those three suffixes, you know, you learned many, many, many medications, and then having that conversation keeps everything in your brain in good space, because I talk about this in the episodes to

Always chart the medications your patients are on in order from, and always using GMRINCE, GI, gastrointestinal, M, musculoskeletal, R, respiratory, I, immune, N, neuro, C, cardio, E, endocrine, by using the exact same order every time, what happens is one, you can catch duplicates a lot easier. Maybe on the chart, you saw the brand name for an ACE inhibitor and then you saw the -pril ending on a generic of a different one. And no one caught that they were the same because one was brand, one was generic or something like that. So again, that's really helpful. So, but memorizing pharmacology podcasts, that's just going to kind of keep you up to date. As I worked through this and really what I'm doing is I'm just recording this for my pharmacology students. I teach multiple pharmacology classes every semester, if you want the whole book and just a seven hour listen that's the Memorizing Pharmacology book, that's the most popular one. In just a day you can pick up the seven primary pathophysiologic classes that gastrointestinal musculoskeletal, respiratory, immune, neuro/psych, cardio, and endocrine. I kind of include renal and also some specifics to like male and female hormones and things like that. But Memorizing Pharmacology, everybody loves that one.

Then if you want to kind of get into the weeds as a pharmacist or pharmacy resident read this one ready by Michael Lenz. He read Memorizing Pharmacology Mnemonics. So, if you really want to get into a little bit more about memorizing those side effects and things like that, Memorizing Pharmacology Mnemonics is it.

And then I worked with Eric Christianson, who is the meded101.com guy on creating an Audible pharmacotherapy book, clinical pharmacy pearls, case studies and common sense, which is extremely popular, as well. So, it depends on what level you really want to start. And I know that as you're kind of going into your APPEs or even the beginning of your residency, you're like, oh my gosh, am I going to remember everything I need to know? And especially for anyone thinking BCGP or that kind of thing the pharmacotherapy book has patients on many dozens of drugs and talks about those kinds of clinical pearls that you need to know.

And the fourth book is one that just nobody can find, but it's excellent as well. The Thrill of the Case, which is a really cool title, but I begged him to change the title to The Thrill of the Pharmacotherapy Case, because it's just impossible to find because if you put in the Thrill of the Case it auto-corrects in Google to the Thrill of the Chase. And this one is similar to the pharmacotherapy book and more case studies, more drug interactions, more clinical pearls when you're talking about medication management then if you just want to, you know, follow my channel TonyPharmD, I have 31,000 subscribers and some people just like to subscribe to this because as soon as the Pharmacy Residency Podcast episode goes, you can, you'll get it on YouTube, or it'll let you know.

If you got to push the bell, though, you got to subscribe to the bell, and then if you want the Memorizing Pharmacology podcasts, these also automatically upload load to that site as well. So, five resources for you Memorizing Pharmacology Podcast, Memorizing Pharmacology, A Relaxed Approach, a seven hour audio book, which you can get free, even if you've if you've never been on Audible before, they'll give it to you free. And I think on Amazon, they'll actually give you two books Memorizing Pharmacology Mnemonics, if you are a bit more advanced, maybe P-3. And then if you are kind of P-r or resident pharmacotherapy with Eric Christiansen on that one as well, or the Thrill of the Case for something a little bit different, and then you can always just follow the TonyPharmD YouTube channel.

But I wanted to make sure that you're aware of all these free resources and availability on Amazon and Audible that if you've never had a book before they will always give you that first one for free. I got questions for me, tonythepharmacist@gmail.com. I was just looking on a Google search and it's kind of funny tonythepharmacist comes above PhORCAS when you put in a pharmacy residency podcast. So, I just thought that that was kind of neat that many of you are listening and I mean, I know the stats, but again, I appreciate it. And if you do have the chance, please do subscribe to the podcast, do subscribe to the TonyPharmD channel. It makes it easier for Apple to know that, okay, we need to put this out there so that more people are able to get this great content. Okay. So, thanks again. And we'll talk to you next time.